¡Abracadabra!

archiemcphee:

Macau-based web designer and developer Varun Thota uses a toy plane that his dad found inside a chocolate Kinder Egg to create an ongoing photography series entitled My Toy Plane, in which a commercial airliner appears to soar over dramatic cityscapes. If it weren’t for the presence of his arm in each shot, you’d probably assume that the plane itself was real. We nearly did.

Through the photos, he not only gets to explore his interest in aviation, but also to build relationships with the people around him. He says, “The thing I enjoy most about the series is how fun it is to include other people in it. It’s always fun to show people the plane, tell them the story and then ask them for a helping hand in taking the shot.”

Follow Varun Thota on Instagram to check out more awesome photos from his My Toy Plane series.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

foreverdai:

Quietoo

death-by-lulz:

Katy Perry’s first and last attempt at crowd surfing

Featured on a 1000Notes.com blog

onlylolgifs:

Mexico’s 7.2 Earthquake at a Swimming Pool 

drespacial:

Atención: Puede contener un 98% menos de felicidad.

drespacial:

Atención: Puede contener un 98% menos de felicidad.

laredesbastaeinfinita:

pablets:

elshowdemonike:

militarymom:

Still married

Odio a la gente que quiere predecir el futuro, aquella que dice esto es imposible o no, ¿tú que sabes qué va a pasar en unos años? yo por lo menos soy positivo….

Quiero contemplar el momento de la humillación cuando se vuelvan a cruzar.

AMEN

mymodernmet:

From March 15 to March 22, a spectacular sight greeted residents of downtown Vancouver: a monumental net sculpture floating in the sky, spanning 745 feet between buildings. Created for the TED Conference’s 30th anniversary, the installation called Unnumbered Sparks is the result of a collaboration between artists Janet Echelman and Aaron Koblin.

Woven from braided fibers, the ethereal net ripples and sways in the sky. At nighttime, the sculpture comes alive with illumination that is choreographed by visitors who gather beneath the net. By making small movements on their mobile devices, visitors can paint spectacular beams of light that streak across the sculpture’s surface in real time.


#i don’t know what i’m doing with my life anymore….

#i don’t know what i’m doing with my life anymore….

archiemcphee:

As part of a tour put on by an organization called The Mystical Arts of Tibet, a group of Tibetan Buddhist monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery in India recently visited the Crow Collection of Asian Art in Dallas, Texas. They were there for a weeklong residency during which they constructed this magnificent Tantric Buddhist mandala sandpainting.

The monks will spend up to eight hours a day working together on one of their sandpaintings. The process starts with an opening ceremony and the consecration of work site.

Each work begins as a drawing, the outline of the mandala. Then, colored sand is poured from traditional metal funnels called chak-purs. Each monk holds a chak-pur in one hand, while running a metal rod on its grated surface; the vibration causes the sands to flow like liquid.

Once the sandpainting has been completed it is ceremoniously destroyed using a ritual vajra.

"The sands are swept up and placed in an urn; to fulfill the function of healing, half is distributed to the audience at the closing ceremony, while the remainder is carried to a nearby body of water, where it is deposited. The waters then carry the healing blessing to the ocean, and from there it spreads throughout the world for planetary healing."

Click here to learn more about The Mystical Arts of Tibet

[via My Modern Metropolis]